Birthweight in offspring and cardiovascular mortality in their parents, aunts and uncles: a family-based cohort study of 1.35 million births.

Fareeha Shaikh, Marte Karoline Kjølllesdal, David Carslake, Camilla Stoltenberg, George Davey Smith, Øyvind Næss

REVIEW


11 November 2019

Clinical relevance is limited. 


RELEVANCE 3
INNOVATIVENESS 3
APPLICABILITY 2
OVERALL 3

PAPER DETAILS


TITLE

Birthweight in offspring and cardiovascular mortality in their parents, aunts and uncles: a family-based cohort study of 1.35 million births.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND
A link between suboptimal fetal growth and higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well documented. It has been difficult to assess the contribution of environmental versus genetic factors to the association, as these factors are closely connected in nuclear families. We investigated the association between offspring birthweight and CVD mortality in parents, aunts and uncles, and examined whether these associations are explained by CVD risk factors.

METHODS
We linked Norwegian data from the Medical Birth Registry, the Cause of Death Registry and cardiovascular surveys. A total of 1 353 956 births (1967-2012) were linked to parents and one maternal and one paternal aunt/uncle. Offspring birthweight and CVD mortality association among all relationships was assessed by hazard ratios (HR) from Cox regressions. The influence of CVD risk factors on the associations was examined in a subgroup.

RESULTS
Offspring birthweight was inversely associated with CVD mortality among parents and aunts/uncles. HR of CVD mortality for one standard deviation (SD) increase in offspring birthweight was 0.72 (0.69-0.75) in mothers and 0.89 (0.86-0.92) in fathers. In aunts/uncles, the HRs were between 0.90 (0.86-0.95) and 0.93 (0.91-0.95). Adjustment for CVD risk factors in a subgroup attenuated all the associations.

CONCLUSIONS
Birthweight was associated with increased risk of CVD in parents and in aunts/uncles. These associations were largely explained by CVD risk factors. Our findings suggest that associations between offspring birthweight and CVD in adult relatives involve both behavioural variables (especially smoking) and shared genetics relating to established CVD risk factors.



AUTHOR(S)

Fareeha Shaikh, Marte Karoline Kjølllesdal, David Carslake, Camilla Stoltenberg, George Davey Smith, Øyvind Næss,

JOURNAL

International journal of epidemiology

PLACE

England